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St. Peter Upon Cornhill

St. Peter’s is situated at the juncture of Cornhill and Gracechurch Street, on land once occupied by London’s Roman Basilica. Although first solidly recorded in 1127, an historical link ( tenuous ) with a Roman heritage gave the church pre-eminence over other city parish churches throughout the medieval period. Costing £ 5,647, the present brick built Post-Fire Church was erected by Joshua Marshall and Abraham Storey, to a design by Christopher Wren and Robert Hooke from 1677-84. Antiquarian John Stowe mentions a Grammar School built on the church grounds during 1447.

The brick Tower forms part of an unusual exterior design, this includes a small Dome with a slender Spire rising from it, and the original ‘ St. Peter’s Key ‘ Weather Vane  topping it off. This design is believed to be the work of Robert Hooke, as drawings in his possession show the same Tower design, but intended  for the Church of St. Clement Danes, not St. Peter upon Cornhill.

St. Peter’s retains many of it’s 17th Century furnishings, and is regarded as one of the best preserved of Wren’s designs. The Chancel Screen is one of only two remaining in the city from this historic period. The Screen, along with Pulpit and Reredos, are all of exceptional quality, they were all made by joiner William Cleere. 

Victorian Architect J.D. Wyatt removed some older furnishings and added Stained Glass in 1872. Composer Felix Mendelssohn played on the Smith Organ (1840) on two occasions in the early 1840’s.

 

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